afacerilemn/woodbusinessportal
Get flash player to play to this file

Brunell - Big fires increasing prices for lumber

WoodBusinessPortal.com > Articles & News
24 September 2017
Member authentication
UserUser
PasswordPassword
no password?
Articles & News Articles & News

The 19th International Specialized Exhibition of Furniture Furniture Technologies and Equipment will coming soon



8,2 million cubic meters of wood from the 45,000 hectares were torn apart by storms in Poland



FIMMA-MADERALIA`s 38th edition will take place on 6th to 9th February 2018



North Africa`s Leading Platform for Wood and Woodworking Machinery



Brunell - Big fires increasing prices for lumber



Despite Ban Millions in Timber Continue to Cross Border



The Brazilian timber market and wooden products tend to increase



Global Timber and Wood Products Market Update



The 4th edition ChinaWoodExpo 2017



Forest exploitation is at its lowest in Switzerland



Wooden construction somewhere in North America with 18 levels



Ecological: Spectacular new church made of wood - architect Eberhard Wimmer in an interview



More than 24.000 hectares of forests from Eastern Europe have entered into UNESCO patrimony



Forestry Wood 2017 Brussels Agro & Food



Wooden houses in the first floating village in Romania



Companies that abused the ENplus seal on their product



Wood houses have become more than just an actual trend in Eastern Europe



You can make a 100% Eco House with wood, straw and tree muscles



Three day national grief in memory of the victims of the terrorist attack in Nice



LIGNA Conference 2016: online registration has now started



Timber industry expects a deterioration



EXPOBOIS now part of the WOODWORLD program of events staged by Deutsche Messe



Kazakhstan International Exhibition - Timber & Woodworking - 2016



LIGNA Conference 2016: featuring everything from furniture-making giants to software titans



Medwood Exhibition, April 7 - 10, 2016



LIGNA 2017 to feature new layout (22 to 26 May)



France: EXPOBOIS spans all areas of the wood industry



UAE home to 36 per cent of furniture factories in GCC, and controls significant imports in timber sector



The Global Forest Industry in the 3Q of 2015



Holzhaus Exhibition 2015



Intermob 2015: Record-Breaking Participation, Leading Companies, Wide Scope, Latest Technologies

Softwood lumber prices continued to fall in many markets around the world in the 2Q of 15 because of weaker demand and high inventories of lumber throughout the distribution chain, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly

SYMOP and Deutsche Messe AG join forces - Makeover for EXPOBOIS

USA: Hardwood plywood imports stable

Future of Forest Industry Forum 2015

EU wood-flooring exports increase again

European timber pallet industry to converge on Ireland

Scandinavian style in wooden bathrooms

The Global Forest Industry in the 2Q of 2015

Elmia Wood Vaggeryd, 07 - 10.06.2017

Brunell - Big fires increasing prices for lumber


Brunell - Big fires increasing prices for lumber
Massive forest fires in western parts of Canada and the U.S. are not only choking us with layers of smoke, but are cutting off lumber supplies around our country.

The result is the cost of a new home is rising because of the growing shortage of framing lumber and laminated decking.

The Wall Street Journal reported the combination of the wildfires and the 30 percent tariff President Donald Trump slapped on Canadian lumber producers are causing lumber shortages and drove up the average prices on new single-family homes nationwide to $406,400 in May.

“More than a half-dozen lumber mills, which produce about 14 percent of the province’s (British Columbia) timber and 3 percent of North American output, according to industry newsletter Random Lengths, have closed. Forest fires haven’t affected prices so dramatically since 2003, said Jon Anderson, the newsletter’s publisher,” WSJ stated.

In terms of public health, calculations by researchers at Canada’s National Forest Carbon Accounting System indicated that last year’s mammoth fire, which evacuated Fort McMurray, released the equivalent of 5 percent of Canada’s annual greenhouse gas emissions, or 41 million tons.

Massive forest fires have been around for centuries in western parts of the U.S. and Canada. For thousands of years semi-arid forests which stretch the length of the western U.S. and Canada’s interior have operated on a cycle of growth, fire and regrowth.

Huge fires are part of Washington’s Cascade Range history as well. For example, in a single week in September 1902, the Yacolt Burn engulfed more than a half-million acres and killed 56 people in the Columbia River Gorge and around Mount St. Helens.

The choking smoke was so thick that ships on the Columbia River were forced to navigate by compass and the street lights in Seattle, 160 miles to the north, glowed at noon.

The Yacolt fires actually forced Weyerhaeuser into lumber milling, particularly in the Longview area, where it built a massive forest products processing complex. The company needed to find a way to recover as much value from its charred trees as possible. That complex also processed salvageable trees from its Mount St. Helens tree farm following the 1980 volcanic eruption.

Logging burned acres of public lands makes sense. A 2015 U.S. Forest Service study of federal forests in the Wenatchee area found that large wildfires can leave behind thousands of acres of fire-killed trees that eventually become fuels for future fires.

In the past logging fire-damaged forests was viewed only for recovery of their economic worth. Now they have a fire-prevention value.

Salvage logging was part of President George W. Bush’s proposed “Healthy Forests” initiative 15 years ago, but critics viewed the program as just a way to increase logging in public forests and killed it.

Bush’s plan called for removing dead and diseased trees before they could fuel large wildfires. Those fires cost hundreds of millions to suppress. (At the time, huge fires in the Wenatchee-Lake Chelan area were fresh on people’s minds).

The logging, milling and replanting of logged land with young trees would create thousands of jobs and add to our nation’s timber supply. It is a way to maintain a healthy growing forest that stores carbon and emits oxygen.

The bottom line is clearing dead trees and debris from the forest floor reduces some of the risk of massive wildfires that pump millions of tons of CO2 into our air.

Global warming seems to be accelerating the number of wildfires across the planet. Those fires are public health threats. Robbing them of their fuel makes sense. So does making lumber more plentiful and affordable.

Source:

http://www.columbian.com/news/2017/aug/15/brunell-big-fires-increasing-prices-for-lumber/
Brunell - Big fires increasing prices for lumber
Brunell - Big fires increasing prices for lumber
August 22, 2017